Images

Enjoying the wildlife on your doorstep

The blue tits have been very active this spring and yesterday they brought their new chicks down from the nest and feed them in the tree next to the patio. I’m not sure wether all this wildlife was as active pre lockdown or wether we are now taking the time to stop and enjoy watching it. Either way, it is a joy to watch.

To edit or not to edit?

As Travel Photographers and Wildlife Photographers we face a dilemma. We want to record what we see and offer the best representation to our followers but we also want to produce the biggest impact with our work.

The leopard in the tree with the washed out sky in the background is the true representation of what I saw. I sat in a boat on the Chobe river for hours waiting for the sunset to change the sky or the leopard to move and offer a better back drop, but no, she was happy sitting against the African bleached out skyline whilst her cub (in the bottom photo) played along the river bank.

The top photo, with the replacement sky has been one of my most successful photos in competition, it is a true representation of the leopard – but not the African skyline along the Chobe river.

Which is best, what is right, how much editing should we do? What are your thoughts – all criticism welcome!

Tower Bridge

Taken from The Scoop on the South Bank of the Thames in London on a wet winter’s evening.

Taken in October 2019 after a heavy rainfall from the Scoop on the South Bank. What captured my imagination was the reflections from the lights on the wide tow path. I’ve photographed the South Bank for many years but this evening brought great reflections, deeper darkness and a more golden light than I had seen before, all of which has emphasised the depth in the photograph.

Twilight

The hour before an autumn dawn over the lakes in Berkshire, UK

Taken in September 2019 at Moore Green Lake in Sandhurst, Berkshire, UK. This photograph was taken 15 minutes before the sun rose over the horizon, my goal was to capture the mist rising from the lake as the first light came in to sight. The light cloud cover on the horizon created the reflections in the sky that in turn brings the lake alive. what I love about this scene is the stillness of the morning mixed with the colours that the morning brings.

Andy

Kasanga

Kasanga is a lion rescued from a circus and is being cared for by the Big Cat Sanctuary in the UK

Taken at the Big Cat Sanctuary in Kent, UK which is a Big Cat conservation and breeding centre dedicated to ensuring the future of these magnificent creatures. Kasanga is the most perfect photographic subject as he thrives on the attention and follows you around the enclosure, keen to show is grander! This photograph was taken at a distance of 4m with a 100mm lens – there was a safety fence between us!

PLay time

This young male plays with the water at the spring in Zimbabwe

Taken in Hwange National Park on the west of Zimbabwe where the wardens have created fresh springs at the waterholes to guarantee the safe future for the elephant population. At this fresh spring the wardens have created a hide, made from a shipping container so it will take the weight of an elephant – just in case! This young male was sent to ensure that the contents of the hide were of no threat to the herd; he stared us out and played with the water before declaring us harmless.

Mother love

Taken in Zimbabwe at the water hole this young elephant holds on to her mother.

Taken in Hwange National Park on the west of Zimbabwe where the wardens have created fresh springs at the waterholes to guarantee the safe future for the elephant population. At this fresh spring the wardens have created a hide, made from a shipping container so it will take the weight of an elephant – just in case! This mother and child were no more than 10M from me as they drank, bathed and mixed with the herd. For me the photograph captures the natural bond between mother and infant in the wild.

Sunrise at Durdle Door

There is only a few weeks each year when you can see the rising sun through the Durdle’s doorway so when the weather forecast and the ‘Clear Outside’ weather App tells you that the sky will be totally clear you know it is time for a 4:30 start to get to the beach on time. However the weather forecast can be wrong! Nevertheless Durdle Door’s magic is still there on cloudy mornings….